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If you do not like the image currently showing, right-click on the desktop again and choose "Next desktop background" to see another one. The images will cycle automatically after an interval giving you something stunning to look at. 6. The use of smaller words and shorter sentences Thruster's marketers describe their product as a Personal Truth Verifier, different from its recognized cousin, the polygraph. You know, that is the gritty real-world lie detector where sweaty guys in fedoras wire you up under bright lights. Trustier is way more high-tech and user-friendly. You plug your phone into a simple little sensing oral appliance connect it for your computer. Then the software gets control of. According to the owner's Links Of London Bracelets manual, it uses "an ingenious new algorithm to detect vocal stress" and identifies shades of truth. Lying, it seems like, produces subtle "micro tremors" of tension in one's vocal cords that normally go undetected but could be acquired by Trustier. With each sentence or a reaction to a question, it flashes an email: "Truth." "Inaccurate." "Slightly Inaccurate." "Subject Not Sure." "False." Little graphs and electronic squiggles chart your conversation just like a type of psychic seismometer. A digital PHR also ensures the production of the health information in the legible form and facilitates the flow of the information between and doctor(s) whether only one physician is treating you or several doctors are participating in your care. Information in the record may be conveyed for a health-care provider(s) verbally, on the internet out form, digitally with an external medium like a usb flash drive, and in many cases via the Internet just before office visits. This simplicity of transfer of medical data is vitally important considering that 18% of medical errors are due to inadequate availability of patient information. Moreover, medical records are frequently lost, doctors retire, hospitals or HMOs purges old records to avoid wasting safe-keeping, and employers frequently change group health care insurance plans leading to patients being forced to change doctors and request for transfer medical records that are sometimes illegible. Despite efforts by government entities to encourage doctors to help keep medical records on the computer, i.e. utilize electronic medical records (EMRs) also called electronic health records (EHRs) in order to reduce errors, the very fact in the matter is just 5% of doctors keep medical records on the pc and a lot of which may have purchased EMRs haven't ever effectively implemented them or continued to use them of their practices.